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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

The urolagnia of masochism is not a simple phenomenon; it embodies a 

double symbolism: on the one hand a symbolism of self-abnegation, such as 

the ascetic feels, on the other hand a symbolism of transferred sexual 

emotion. Krafft-Ebing was disposed to regard all cases in which a 

scatalogical sexual attraction existed as due to "latent masochism." Such 

a point of view is quite untenable. Certainly the connection is common, 

but in the majority of cases of slightly marked scatalogical fetichism no 

masochism is evident. And when we bear in mind the various considerations, 

already brought forward, which show how widespread and clearly realized is 

the natural and normal basis furnished for such symbolism, it becomes 

quite unnecessary to invoke any aid from masochism. There is ample 

evidence to show that, either as a habitual or more usually an occasional 

act, the impulse to bestow a symbolic value on the act of urination in a 

beloved person, is not extremely uncommon; it has been noted of men of 

high intellectual distinction; it occurs in women as well as men; when 

existing in only a slight degree, it must be regarded as within the normal 

limits of variation of sexual emotion. 

 

The occasional cases in which the urine is drunk may possibly 

suggest that the motive lies in the properties of the fluid 

acting on the system. Support for this supposition might be found 

in the fact that urine actually does possess, apart altogether 

from its magic virtues embodied in folk-lore, the properties of a 

general stimulant. In composition (as Masterman first pointed 

out) "beef-tea differs little from healthy urine," containing 

exactly the same constituents, except that in beef-tea there is 

less urea and uric acid. Fresh urine--more especially that of 

children and young women--is taken as a medicine in nearly all 

parts of the world for various disorders, such as epistaxis, 

malaria and hysteria, with benefit, this benefit being almost 

certainly due to its qualities as a general stimulant and 

restorative. William Salmon's _Dispensatory_, 1678 (quoted in 

_British Medical Journal_, April 21, 1900, p. 974), shows that in 

the seventeenth century urine still occupied an important place 

as a medicine, and it frequently entered largely into the 

composition of Aqua Divina. 

 

Its use has been known even in England in the nineteenth century. 

(Masterman, _Lancet_, October 2, 1880; R. Neale, "Urine as a 

Medicine," _Practitioner_, November, 1881; Bourke brings together 

a great deal of evidence as to the therapeutic uses of urine in 

his _Scatalogic Rites_, especially pp. 331-335; Lusini has shown 

that normal urine invariably increases the frequency of the heart 

beats, _Archivio di Farmacologia_, fascs. 19-21, 1893.) 

 

But it is an error to suppose that these facts account for the 

urolagnic drinking of urine. As in the gratification of a normal 

sexual impulse, the intense excitement of gratifying a scatalogic 

sexual impulse itself produces a degree of emotional stimulation 

far greater than the ingestion of a small amount of animal 

extractives would be adequate to effect. In such cases, as much 

as in normal sexuality, the stimulation is clearly psychic. 


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