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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

In a case of Moll's the development of a youthful admiration for 

the nates in a coprolagnic direction may be clearly traced. In 

this case a young man, a merchant, in a good position, sought to 

come in contact with women defecating; and with this object would 

seek to conceal himself in closets; the excretal odor was 

pleasurable to him, but was not essential to gratification, and 

the sight of the nates was also exciting and at the same time not 

essential to gratification; the act of defecation appears, 

however, to have been regarded as essential. He never sought to 

witness prostitutes in this situation; he was only attracted to 

young, pretty and innocent women. The coprolagnia here, however, 

had its source in a childish impression of admiration for the 

nates. When 5 or 6 years old he crawled under the clothes of a 

servant girl, his face coming in contact with her nates, an 

impression that remained associated in his mind with pleasure. 

Three or four years later he used to experience much pleasure 

when a young girl cousin sat on his face; thus was strengthened 

an association which developed naturally into coprolagnia. (Moll, 

_Untersuchungen ueber die Libido Sexualis_, bd. i, p. 837.) 

 

It is scarcely necessary to remark that an admiration for the 

nates, even when reaching a fetichistic degree, by no means 

necessarily involves, even after many years, any attraction to 

the excreta. A correspondent for whom the nates have constituted 

a fetich for many years writes: "I find my craving for women with 

profuse pelvic or posterior development is growing and I wish to 

copulate from behind; but I would feel a sickening feeling if any 

part of my person came in contact with the female anus. It is 

more pleasing to me to see the nates than the mons, yet I loathe 

everything associated with the anal region." 

 

Moll has recorded in detail a case of what may be described as "ideal 

coprolagnia"--that is to say, where the symbolism, though fully developed 

in imagination, was not carried into real life--which is of great interest 

because it shows how, in a very intelligent subject, the deviated 

symbolism may become highly developed and irradiate all the views of life 

in the same way as the normal impulse. (The subject's desires were also 

inverted, but from the present point of view the psychological interest of 

the case is not thereby impaired.) Moll's case was one of symbolism of 

act, the excreta offering no attraction apart from the process of 

defecation. In a case which has been communicated to me there was, on the 

other hand, an olfactory fetichistic attraction to the excreta even in the 

absence of the person. 

 

In Moll's case, the patient, X., 23 years of age, belongs to a 

family which he himself describes as nervous. His mother, who is 

anaemic, has long suffered from almost periodical attacks of 

excitement, weakness, syncope and palpitation. A brother of the 

mother died in a lunatic asylum, and several other brothers 

complain much of their nerves. The mother's sisters are very 

good-natured, but liable to break out in furious passions; this 

they inherit from their father. There appears to be no nervous 


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