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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

sense, so that the earliest interest may be akin to that in fur, 

which is a marked object in infant experience. Some children 

develop an almost fetichistic propensity to pull or later to 

stroke the hair or beard of every one with whom they come in 

contact." (G. Stanley Hall, "The Early Sense of Self," _American 

Journal of Psychology_, April, 1898, p. 359.) 

 

It should be added that the fascination of hair for the infantile 

and childish mind is not necessarily one of attraction, but may 

be of repulsion. It happens here, as in the case of so many 

characteristics which are of sexual significance, that we are in 

the presence of an object which may exert a dynamic emotional 

force, a force which is capable of repelling with the same energy 

that it attracts. Fere records the instructive case of a child of 

3, of psychopathic heredity, who when he could not sleep was 

sometimes taken by his mother into her bed. One night his hand 

came in contact with a hairy portion of his mother's body, and 

this, arousing the idea of an animal, caused him to leap out of 

the bed in terror. He became curious as to the cause of his 

terror and in time was able to observe "the animal," but the 

train of feelings which had been set up led to a life-long 

indifference to women and a tendency to homosexuality. It is 

noteworthy that he was attracted to men in whom the hair and 

other secondary sexual characters were well developed. (Fere, 

_L'Instinct Sexuel_, second edition, pp. 262-267.) 

 

As a sexual fetich hair strictly belongs to the group of parts of 

the body; but since it can be removed from the body and is 

sexually effective as a fetich in the absence of the person to 

whom it belongs, it is on a level with the garments which may 

serve in a similar way, with shoes or handkerchiefs or gloves. 

Psychologically, hair-fetichism presents no special problem, but 

the wide attraction of hair--it is sexually the most generally 

noted part of the feminine body after the eyes--and the peculiar 

facility with which when plaited it may be removed, render 

hair-fetichism a sexual perversion of specially great 

medico-legal interest. 

 

The frequency of hair-fetichism, as well as of the natural 

admiration on which it rests, is indicated by a case recorded by 

Laurent. "A few years ago," he states, "one constantly saw at the 

Bal Bullier, in Paris, a tall girl whose face was lean and bony, 

but whose black hair was of truly remarkable length. She wore it 

flowing down her shoulders and loins. Men often followed her in 

the street to touch or kiss the hair. Others would accompany her 

home and pay her for the mere pleasure of touching and kissing 

the long black tresses. One, in consideration of a relatively 

considerable sum, desired to pollute the silky hair. She was 

obliged to be always on her guard, and to take all sorts of 

precautions to prevent any one cutting off this ornament, which 

constituted her only beauty as well as her livelihood." (E. 

Laurent, _L'Amour Morbide_, 1891, p. 164; also the same author's 

_Fetichistes et Erotomanes_, p. 23.) 


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