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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

[36] The Countess of Pembroke, Sir Philip Sidney's sister, appears to have 

found sexual enjoyment in the contemplation of the sexual prowess of 

stallions. Aubrey writes that she "was very salacious and she had a 

contrivance that in the spring of the year ... the stallions ... were to 

be brought before such a part of the house where she had a vidette to look 

on them." (_Short Lives_, 1898, vol. i, p. 311.) Although the modern 

editor's modesty has caused the disappearance of several lines from this 

passage, the general sense is clear. In the same century Burchard, the 

faithful secretary of Pope Alexander VI, describes in his invaluable diary 

how four race horses were brought to two mares in a court of the Vatican, 

the horses clamorously fighting for the possession of the mares and 

eventually mounting them, while the Pope and his daughter Lucrezia looked 

on from a window "cum magno risu et delectatione." (_Diarium_, ed Thuasne, 

vol. III, p. 169.) 

 

[37] _Archivio di Psichiatria_, 1902, fasc. ii-iii, p. 338. In the case of 

pathological sexuality in a boy of 15, reported by A. MacDonald, and 

already summarized, the sight of copulating flies is also mentioned among 

many other causes of sexual excitation. 

 

[38] Krafft-Ebing presents or quotes typical cases of all these fetiches, 

_Op. cit._, pp. 255-266. 

 

[39] G. Stanley Hall, "A study of Fears," _American Journal of 

Psychology_, 1897, pp. 213-215. 

 

[40] _Op. cit._, p. 268. 

 

[41] W. Howard, "Sexual Perversion," _Alienist and Neurologist_, January, 

1896. Krafft-Ebing (op. cit., p. 532) quotes from Boeteau the somewhat 

similar case of a gardener's boy of 16--an illegitimate child of 

neuropathic heredity and markedly degenerate--who had a passion, of 

irresistible and impulsive character, for rabbits. He was declared 

irresponsible. Moll (_Untersuchungen ueber die Libido Sexualis_, bd. i, pp. 

431-433) presents the case of a neurotic man who from the age of 15 had 

been sexually excited by the sight of animals or by contact with them. He 

had repeatedly had connection with cows and mares; he was also sexually 

excited by sheep, donkeys, and dogs, whether female or male; the normal 

sexual instinct was weak and he experienced very slight attraction to 

women. 

 

[42] Moll also remarks ("Perverse Sexualempfindung," in Senator's and 

Kaminer's _Krankheiten und Ehe_) that in this matter it is often hardly 

possible to draw a sharp line between vice and disease. 

 

[43] Instances of this widespread belief--found among the Tamils of Ceylon 

as well as in Europe--are quoted from various authors by Bloch, _Beitraege 

zur AEtiologie der Psychopathia Sexualis_, Teil II, p. 278, and Moll, 

_Untersuchungen ueber die Libido Sexualis_, bd. i, p. 700. On the frequency 

of bestiality, from one cause or another, in the East, see, e.g., Stern, 

_Medizin und Geschlechtsleben in der Tuerkei_, bd. ii, p. 219. 

 

[44] Sometimes (as among the Aleuts) the animal pantomime dances of 

savages may represent the transformation of a captive bird into a lovely 

woman who falls exhausted into the arms of the hunter. (H.H. Bancroft, 

_Native Races of the Pacific_, vol. i, p. 93.) A system of beliefs which 

accepts the possibility that a human being may be latent in an animal 


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