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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

obviously favors the practice of bestiality. 

 

[45] For an example of the primitive confusion between the intercourse of 

women with animals and with men see, e.g., Boas, "Sagen aus 

British-Columbia," _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, heft V, p. 558. 

 

[46] Herodotus, Book II, Chapter 46. 

 

[47] Dulare (_Des Divinites Generatrices_, Chapter II) brings together the 

evidence showing that in Egypt women had connection with the sacred goat, 

apparently in order to secure fertility. 

 

[48] Various facts and references bearing on this subject are brought 

together by Blumenbach, _Anthropological Memoirs_, translated by Bendyshe, 

p. 80; Block, _Beitraege zur AEtiologie der Psychopathia Sexualis_, 

Teil II, pp. 276-283; also Ploss and Bartels, _Das Weib_, seventh edition, 

p. 520. 

 

[49] Mantegazza mentions (_Gli Amori degli Uomini_, cap V) that at Rimini 

a young goatherd of the Apennines, troubled with dyspepsia and nervous 

symptoms, told him this was due to excesses with the goats in his care. A 

finely executed marble group of a satyr having connection with a goat, 

found at Herculaneum and now in the Naples Museum (reproduced in Fuchs's 

_Erotische Element in der Karikatur_), perhaps symbolizes a traditional 

and primitive practice of the goatherd. 

 

[50] Bayle (_Dictionary_, Art, Bathyllus) quotes various authorities 

concerning the Italian auxiliaries in the south of France in the sixteenth 

century and their custom of bringing and using goats for this purpose. 

Warton in the eighteenth century was informed that in Sicily priests in 

confession habitually inquired of herdsmen if they had anything to do with 

their sows. In Normandy priests are advised to ask similar questions. 

 

[51] It is worth noting that in Greek the work choiros means both a sow 

and a woman's pudenda; in the _Acharnians_ Aristophanes plays on this 

association at some length. The Romans also (as may be gathered from 

Varro's _De Re Rustica_) called the feminine pudenda _porcus_. 

 

[52] Schurig, _Gynaecologia_, pp. 280-387; Bloch, op. cit., 270-277. The 

Arabs, according to Kocher, chiefly practice bestiality with goats, sheep 

and mares. The Annamites, according to Mondiere, commonly employ sows and 

(more especially the young women) dogs. Among the Tamils of Ceylon 

bestiality with goats and cows is said to be very prevalent. 

 

[53] Mantegazza (_Gli Amori degli Uomini_, cap. V) brings together some 

facts bearing on this matter. 


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