Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

VI. 

 

The Forms of Erotic Symbolism are Simulacra of Coitus--Wide 

Extension of Erotic Symbolism--Fetichism Not Covering the Whole 

Ground of Sexual Selection--It is Based on the Individual Factor in 

Selection--Crystallization--The Lover and the Artist--The Key to Erotic 

Symbolism to be Found in the Emotional Sphere--The Passage to Pathological 

Extremes. 

 

 

We have now examined several very various and yet very typical 

manifestations in all of which it is not difficult to see how, in some 

strange and eccentric form--on a basis of association through resemblance 

or contiguity or both combined--there arises a definite mimicry of the 

normal sexual act together with the normal emotions which accompany that 

act. It has become clear in what sense we are justified in recognizing 

erotic symbolism. 

 

The symbolic and, as it were, abstracted nature of these 

manifestations is shown by the remarkable way in which they are 

sometimes capable of transference from the object to the subject. 

That is to say that the fetichist may show a tendency to 

cultivate his fetich in his own person. A foot-fetichist may like 

to go barefoot himself; a man who admired lame women liked to 

halt himself; a man who was attracted by small waists in women 

found sexual gratification in tight-lacing himself; a man who was 

fascinated by fine white skin and wished to cut it found 

satisfaction in cutting his own skin; Moll's coprolagnic 

fetichist found a voluptuous pleasure in his own acts of 

defecation. (See, e.g., Krafft-Ebing, _Op. cit._, p. 221, 224, 

226; Hammond, _Sexual Impotence_, p. 74; cf. _ante_, p. 68.) Such 

symbolic transference seems to have a profoundly natural basis, 

for we may see a somewhat similar phenomenon in the well-known 

tendency of cows to mount a cow in heat. This would appear to be, 

not so much a homosexual impulse, as the dynamic psychic action 

of an olfactory sexual symbol in a transformed form. 

 

We seem to have here a psychic process which is a curious 

reversal of that process of _Einfuehlung_--the projection of one's 

own activities into the object contemplated--which Lipps has so 

fruitfully developed as the essence of every aesthetic condition. 

(T. Lipps, _AEsthetik_, Teil I, 1903.) By _Einfuehlung_ our own 

interior activity becomes the activity of the object perceived, 

a thing being beautiful in proportion as it lends itself to our 

_Einfuehlung_. But by this action of erotic symbolism, on the 

other hand, we transfer the activity of the object into 

ourselves. 

 

When the idea of erotic symbolism as manifested in such definite and 

typical forms becomes realized, it further becomes clear that the vaguer 

manifestations of such symbolism are exceedingly widespread. When in a 

previous volume we were discussing and drawing together the various 

threads which unite "Love and Pain," it will now be understood that we 

were standing throughout on the threshold of erotic symbolism. Pain 

itself, in the sense in which we slowly learned to define it in this 

relationship--as a state of intense emotional excitement--may, under a 

great variety of special circumstances, become an erotic symbol and afford 

the same relief as the emotions normally accompanying the sexual act. 


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