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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

they witness to congenital morbidity, the phenomena of erotic symbolism 

can scarcely fail to be profoundly impressive to the patient and impartial 

student of the human soul. They often seem absurd, sometimes disgusting, 

occasionally criminal; they are always, when carried to an extreme degree, 

abnormal. But of all the manifestations of sexual psychology, normal and 

abnormal, they are the most specifically human. More than any others they 

involve the potently plastic force of the imagination. They bring before 

us the individual man, not only apart from his fellows, but in opposition, 

himself creating his own paradise. They constitute the supreme triumph of 

human idealism. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[64] Binet, _Etudes de Psychologie Experimentale_, esp., p. 84; 

Krafft-Ebing, _Op. cit._, p. 18. 

 

[65] G. Tarde, "L'Amour Morbide," _Archives de l'Anthropologie 

Criminelle_, 1890, p. 585. 

 

[66] Lucretius, Lib. IV, vv. 1150-1163. 

 

[67] Burton, _Anatomy of Melancholy_, Part III, Section II, Mem. III, 

Subs. I. 

 

[68] Judith Cladel, _Auguste Rodin Pris sur la Vie_, 1903, pp. 103-104. 

Some slight modifications have been made in the translation of this 

passage on account of the conversational form of the original. 

 

[69] W. Cyples, _The Process of Human Experience_, p. 462. Even if (as we 

have already seen, _ante_, p. 58) the saint cannot always feel actual 

physical pleasure in the intimate contact of humanity, the ardor of 

devoted service which his vision of humanity arouses remains unaffected. 

 

[70] "To love," as Stendhal defined it (_De l'Amour_, Chapter II), "is to 

have pleasure in seeing, touching, and feeling by all the senses, and as 

near as possible, a beloved object by whom one is oneself loved." 

 

[71] Pillon's study of "La Memoire Affective" (_Revue Philosophique_, 

February, 1901) helps to explain the psychic mechanism of the process. 

 


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