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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

and the sperm-cell are essentially different from each other. Sexual 

conjugation thus remains a process which is radically the same as the 

non-sexual mode of propagation which preceded it. The fusion of the nuclei 

of the two cells was regarded by Van Beneden, who in 1875 first accurately 

described it, as a process of conjugation comparable to that of the 

protozoa and the protophyta. Boveri, who has further extended our 

knowledge of the process, considers that the spermatozoon removes an 

inhibitory influence preventing the commencement of development in the 

ovum; the spermatozoon replaces a portion of the ovum which has already 

undergone degeneration, so that the object of conjugation is chiefly to 

effect the union of the properties of two cells in one, sexual 

fertilization achieving a division of labor with reciprocal inhibition; 

the two cells have renounced their original faculty of separate 

development in order to attain a fusion of qualities and thus render 

possible that production of new forms and qualities which has involved the 

progress of the organized world.[74] 

 

While in fishes this conjugation of the male and female elements is 

usually ensured by the female casting her spawn into an artificial nest 

outside the body, on to which the male sheds his milt, in all animals 

(and, to some extent, birds, who occupy an intermediate position) there is 

an organic nest, or incubation chamber as Bland Sutton terms it, the womb, 

in the female body, wherein the fertilized egg may develop to a high 

degree of maturity sheltered from those manifold risks of the external 

world which make it necessary for the spawn of fishes to be so enormous in 

amount. Since, however, men and women have descended from remote ancestors 

who, in the manner of aquatic creatures, exercised functions of 

sperm-extrusion and germ-extrusion that were exactly analogous in the two 

sexes, without any specialized female uterine organization, the early 

stages of human male and female foetal development still display the 

comparatively undifferentiated sexual organization of those remote 

ancestors, and during the first months of foetal life it is practically 

impossible to tell by the inspection of the genital regions whether the 

embryo would have developed into a man or into a woman. If we examine the 

embryo at an early stage of development we see that the hind end is the 

body stalk, this stalk in later stages becoming part of the umbilical 

cord. The urogenital region, formed by the rapid extension of the hind 

end beyond its original limit, which corresponds to what is later the 

umbilicus, develops mainly by the gradual differentiation of structures 

(the Wolffian and Muellerian bodies) which originally exist identically in 

both sexes. This process of sexual differentiation is highly complex, so 

that it cannot yet be said that there is complete agreement among 

investigators as to its details. When some irregularity or arrest of 

development occurs in the process we have one or other of the numerous 

malformations which may affect this region. If the arrest occurs at a very 

early stage we may even find a condition of things which seems to 

approximate to that which normally exists in the adult reptilia.[75] Owing 

to the fact that both male and female organs develop from more primitive 


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