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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

and the pudendal constitute the main supply of the external 

genitals. In women the pudic nerve is equally large, but the 

pudendal much smaller, possibly, Bryan Robinson suggests, because 

women take a less active part in coitus. The nerve supply of the 

clitoris, however, is three or four times as large as that of the 

penis in proportion to size. (F.B. Robinson, "The Intimate 

Nervous Connection of the Genito-Urinary Organs With the 

Cerebro-Spinal and Sympathetic Systems," _New York Medical 

Journal_, March 11, 1893; id., _The Abdominal Brain_, 1899.) 

 

Of all the sexual organs the penis is without doubt that which has most 

powerfully impressed the human imagination. It is the very emblem of 

generation, and everywhere men have contemplated it with a mixture of 

reverence and shuddering awe that has sometimes, even among civilized 

peoples, amounted to horror and disgust. Its image is worn as an amulet to 

ward off evil and invoked as a charm to call forth blessing. The sexual 

organs were once the most sacred object on which a man could place his 

hands to swear an inviolate oath, just as now he takes up the Testament. 

Even in the traditions of the great classic civilization which we inherit 

the penis is _fascinus_, the symbol of all fascination. In the history of 

human culture it has had far more than a merely human significance; it has 

been the symbol of all the generative force of Nature, the embodiment of 

creative energy in the animal and vegetable worlds alike, an image to be 

held aloft for worship, the sign of all unconscious ecstasy. As a symbol, 

the sacred phallus, it has been woven in and out of all the highest and 

deepest human conceptions, so intimately that it is possible to see it 

everywhere, that it is possible to fail to see it anywhere. 

 

In correspondence with the importance of the penis is the large number of 

names which men have everywhere bestowed upon it. In French literature 

many hundred synonyms may be found. They were also numerous in Latin. In 

English the literary terms for the penis seem to be comparatively few, but 

a large number of non-literary synonyms exist in colloquial and perhaps 

merely local usage. The Latin term penis, which has established itself 

among us as the most correct designation, is generally considered to be 

associated with _pendere_ and to be connected therefore with the usually 

pendent position of the organ. In the middle ages the general literary 

term throughout Europe was _coles_ (or _colis_) from _caulis_, a stalk, 

and _virga_, a rod. The only serious English literary term, yard (exactly 

equivalent to _virga_), as used by Chaucer--almost the last great English 

writer whose vocabulary was adequate to the central facts of life--has now 

fallen out of literary and even colloquial usage. 

 

Pierer and Chaulant, in their anatomical and physiological 

_Real-Lexicon_ (vol. vi, p. 134), give nearly a hundred synonyms 

for the penis. Hyrtl (_Topographisches Anatomie_, seventh 

edition, vol. ii, pp. 67-69), adds others. Schurig, in his 

_Spermatologia_ (1720, pp. 89-91), also presents a number of 

names for the penis; in Chapter III (pp. 189-192) of the same 

book he discusses the penis generally with more fullness than 


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