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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the peculiarly human cushion of fat picturesquely termed the Mons Veneris 

(because, as Palfyn said, all those who enroll themselves under the banner 

of Venus must necessarily scale it), and even that is veiled from view in 

the adult by the more or less bushy plantation of hair which grows upon 

it. A triangle of varyingly precise definition is thus formed at the lower 

apex of the trunk, and this would sometimes appear to have been regarded 

as a feminine symbol.[80] But the more usual and typical symbol of 

femininity is the idealized ring (by some savages drawn as a lozenge) of 

the vulvar opening--the _yoni_ corresponding to the masculine 

_lingam_--which is normally closed from view by the larger lips arising 

from beneath the shadow of the _mons_. It is a symbol that, like the 

masculine phallus, has a double meaning among primitive peoples and is 

sometimes used to call down a blessing and sometimes to invoke a 

curse.[81] 

 

This external opening of the feminine genital passage with its two 

enclosing lips is now generally called the vulva. It would appear that 

originally (as by Celsus and Pliny) this term included the womb, also, but 

when the term "uterus" came into use "vulva" was confined (as its sense of 

folding doors suggests that it should be) to the external entrance. The 

classic term _cunnus_ for the external genitals was chiefly used by the 

poets; it has been the etymological source of various European names for 

this region, such as the old French _con_, which has now, however, 

disappeared from literature while even in popular usage it has given place 

to _lapin_ and similar terms. But there is always a tendency, marked in 

most parts of the world, for the names of the external female parts to 

become indecorous. Even in classic antiquity this part was the _pudendum_, 

the part to be ashamed of, and among ourselves the mass of the 

population, still preserving the traditions of primitive times, continue 

to cherish the same notion. 

 

The anatomy, anthropology, folk-lore, and terminology of the 

external and to some extent the internal feminine sexual region 

may be studied in the following publications, among others: 

Ploss, _Das Weib_, vol. i, Chapter VI; Hyrtl, _Topographisches 

Anatomie_, vol. ii, and other publications by the same scholarly 

anatomist; W.J. Stewart Mackay, _History of Ancient Gynaecology_, 

especially pp. 244-250; R. Bergh, "Symbolae ad Cognitionem 

Genitalium Externorum Foeminearum" (in Danish), 

_Hospitalstidende_, August, 1894; and also in _Monatshefte fuer 

Praktische Dermatologie_, 1897. D.S. Lamb, "The Female External 

Genital Organs," _New York Journal of Gynaecology_, August, 1894; 

R.L. Dickinson, "Hypertrophies of the Labia Minora and Their 

Significance," _American Gynecology_, September, 1902; Kryptadia 

(in various languages), vol. viii, pp. 3-11, 11-13, and many 

other passages. Several of Schurig's works (especially 

_Gynaecologia_, _Muliebria_, and _Parthenologia_) contain full 

summaries of the statements of the early writers. 

 

The external or larger lips, like the mons veneris, are specifically human 

in their full development, for in the anthropoid apes they are small as is 


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