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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

to define. 

 

Various observations and remarks made during the past two or 

three centuries by Bond, Valisneri, Dionis, Haller, Guenther, and 

Bischoff, tending to show a sucking action of the uterus in both 

women and other female animals, have been brought together by 

Litzmann in R. Wagner's _Handwoerterbuch der Physiologie_ (1846, 

vol. iii, p. 53). Litzmann added an experience of his own: "I had 

an opportunity lately, while examining a young and very erethic 

woman, to observe how suddenly the uterus assumed a more erect 

position, and descended deeper in the pelvis; the lips of the 

womb became equal in length, the cervix rounded, softer, and more 

easily reached by the finger, and at the same time a high state 

of sexual excitement was revealed by the respiration and voice." 

 

The general belief still remained, however, that the woman's part 

in conjugation is passive, and that it is entirely by the energy 

of the male organ and of the male sexual elements, the 

spermatozoa, that conjunction with the germ cell is attained. 

According to this theory, it was believed that the spermatozoa 

were, as Wilkinson expresses it, in a history of opinion on this 

question, "endowed with some sort of intuition or instinct; that 

they would turn in the direction of the os uteri, wading through 

the acid mucus of the vagina; travel patiently upward and around 

the vaginal portion of the uterus; enter the uterus and proceed 

onward in search of the waiting ovum." (A.D. Wilkinson, 

"Sterility in the Female," _Transactions of the Lincoln Medical 

Society_, Nebraska, 1896.) 

 

About the year 1859 Fichstedt seems to have done something to 

overthrow this theory by declaring his belief that the uterus was 

not, as commonly supposed, a passive organ in coitus, but was 

capable of sucking in the semen during the brief period of 

detumescence. Various authorities then began to bring forward 

arguments and observations in the same sense. Wernich, 

especially, directed attention to this point in 1872 in a paper 

on the erectile properties of the lower segment of the uterus 

("Die Erectionsfahigkeit des untern Uterus-Abschnitts," _Beitraege 

zur Geburtshuelfe und Gynaekologie_, vol. i, p. 296). He made 

precise observations and came to the conclusion that owing to 

erectile properties in the neck of the uterus, this part of the 

womb elongates during congress and reaches down into the pelvis 

with an aspiratory movement, as if to meet the glans of the male. 

A little later, in a case of partial prolapse, Beck, in ignorance 

of Wernich's theory, was enabled to make a very precise 

observation of the action of the uterus during excitement. In 

this case the woman was sexually very excitable even under 

ordinary examination, and Beck carefully noted the phenomena that 

took place during the orgasm. "The os and cervix uteri," he 

states, "had been about as firm as usual, moderately hard and, 

generally speaking, in a natural and normal condition, with the 

external os closed to such an extent as to admit of the uterine 

probe with difficulty; but the instant that the height of 


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