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PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the physiological effects of consuming the semen or testes. Thus, 

according to W.H. Pearse (_Scalpel_, December, 1897), it is the 

custom in Cornwall for country maids to eat the testicles of the 

young male lambs when they are castrated in the spring, the 

survival, probably, of a very ancient religious cult. (I have not 

myself been able to hear of this custom in Cornwall.) In 

Burchard's Penitential (Cap. CLIV, Wasserschleben, op. cit., p. 

660) seven years' penance is assigned to the woman who swallows 

her husband's semen to make him love her more. In the seventeenth 

century (as shown in William Salmon's _London Dispensatory_, 

1678) semen was still considered to be good against witchcraft 

and also valuable as a love-philter, in which latter capacity its 

use still survives. (Bourke, _Scatalogic Rites_, pp. 343, 355.) 

In an earlier age (Picart, quoted by Crawley, _The Mystic Rose_, 

p. 109) the Manichaeans, it is said, sprinkled their eucharistic 

bread with human semen, a custom followed by the Albigenses. 

 

The belief, perhaps founded in experience, that semen possesses 

medical and stimulant virtues was doubtless fortified by the 

ancient opinion that the spinal cord is the source of this fluid. 

This was not only held by the highest medical authorities in 

Greece, but also in India and Persia. 

 

The semen is thus a natural stimulant, a physiological 

aphrodisiac, the type of a class of drugs which have been known 

and cultivated in all parts of the world from time immemorial. 

(Dufour has discussed the aphrodisiacs used in ancient Rome, 

_Histoire de la Prostitution_, vol. II, ch. 21.) It would be vain 

to attempt to enumerate all the foods and medicaments to which 

has been ascribed an influence in heightening the sexual impulse. 

(Thus, in the sixteenth century, aphrodisiacal virtues were 

attributed to an immense variety of foods by Liebault in his 

_Thresor des Remedes Secrets pour les Maladies des Femmes_, 1585, 

pp. 104, et seq.) A large number of them certainly have no such 

effect at all, but have obtained this credit either on some 

magical ground or from a mistaken association. Thus the potato, 

when first introduced from America, had the reputation of being a 

powerful aphrodisiac, and the Elizabethan dramatists contain many 

references to this supposed virtue. As we know, potatoes, even 

when taken in the largest doses, have not the slightest 

aphrodisiac effect, and the Irish peasantry, whose diet consists 

very largely of potatoes, are even regarded as possessing an 

unusually small measure of sexual feeling. It is probable that 

the mistake arose from the fact that potatoes were originally a 

luxury, and luxuries frequently tend to be regarded as 

aphrodisiacs, since they are consumed under circumstances which 

tend to arouse the sexual desires. It is possible also that, as 

has been plausibly suggested, the misunderstanding may have been 

due to sailors--the first to be familiar with the potato--who 

attributed to this particular element of their diet ashore the 

generally stimulating qualities of their life in port. The eryngo 


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