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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

nervousness or dread of coitus, and women, in whom orgasm has 

been difficult to reach, have frequently found this facilitated 

by some previous indulgence in alcohol. The aphrodisiac effect of 

alcohol seems specially marked on women. But against the use of 

alcohol as an aphrodisiac it must be remembered that it is far 

from being a tonic to detumescence, at all events in men, and 

that there is much evidence tending to show that not only chronic 

alcoholism, but even procreation during intoxication is perilous 

to the offspring (see, e.g., Andriezen, _Journal of Mental 

Science_, January, 1905, and cf. W.C. Sullivan, "Alcoholism and 

Suicidal Impulses," ib., April, 1898, p. 268); it may be added 

that Bunge has found a very high proportion of cases of 

immoderate use of alcohol in the fathers of women unable to 

suckle their infants (G. von Bunge, _Die Zunehmende Unfaehigkeit 

der Frauen ihre Kinder zu Stillen_, 1903) while even an 

approximation to the drunken state is far from being a desirable 

prelude to the creation of a new human being. It is obvious that 

those who wish, for any reason, to cultivate a strict chastity of 

thought and feeling would do well to avoid alcohol altogether, or 

only in its lightest forms and in moderation. The aphrodisiacal 

effects of wine have long been known; Ovid refers to them (e.g., 

_Ars Am._, Bk. III, 765). Clement of Alexandria, who was 

something of a man of science as well as a Christian moralist, 

points out the influence of wine in producing lasciviousness and 

sexual precocity. (_Paedagogus_, Bk. II, Chapter II). Chaucer 

makes the Wife of Bath say in the Wife of Bath's Prologue:-- 

 

"And, after wyn, on Venus moste [needs] I thinke: 

For al so siken as cold engendreth hayl, 

A likerous mouth moste have a likerous tayl, 

In womman vinolent is no defense, 

This knowen lechours by experience." 

 

Alcohol, as Chaucer pointed out, comes to the aid of the man, who 

is unscrupulous in his efforts to overcome a woman, and this not 

merely by virtue of its aphrodisiacal effects, and the apparently 

special influence which it seems to exert on women, but also 

because it lulls the mental and emotional characteristics which 

are the guardians of personality. A correspondent who has 

questioned on this point a number of prostitutes he has known, 

writes: "Their accounts of the first fall were nearly always the 

same. They got to know a 'gentleman,' and on one occasion they 

drank too much; before they quite realized what was happening 

they were no longer virgins." "In the mental areas, under the 

influence of alcohol," Schmiedeberg remarks (in his _Elements of 

Pharmacology_), "the finer degrees of observation, judgment, and 

reflection are the first to disappear, while the remaining mental 

functions remain in a normal condition. The soldier acts more 

boldly because he notices dangers less and reflects over them 

less; the orator does not allow himself to be influenced by any 

disturbing side-considerations as to his audience, hence he 

speaks more freely and spiritedly; self-consciousness is lost to 


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