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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

Among anaphrodisiacs, or sexual sedatives, bromide of potassium, 

by virtue of its antidotal relationship to strychnia, is one of 

the drugs whose action is most definite, though, while it dulls 

sexual desire, it also dulls all the nervous and cerebral 

activities. Camphor has an ancient reputation as an 

anaphrodisiac, and its use in this respect was known to the Arabs 

(as may be seen by a reference to it in the _Perfumed Garden_), 

while, as Hyrtl mentions (loc. cit. ii, p. 94), rue (_Ruta 

graveolens_) was considered a sexual sedative by the monks of 

old, who on this account assiduously cultivated it in their 

cloister gardens to make _vinum rutae_. Recently heroin in large 

doses (see, e.g., Becker, _Berliner Klinische Wochenschrift_, 

November 23, 1903) has been found to have a useful effect in this 

direction. It may be doubted, however, whether there is any 

satisfactory and reliable anaphrodisiac. Charcot, indeed, it is 

said, used to declare that the only anaphrodisiac in which he had 

any confidence was that used by the uncle of Heloise in the case 

of Abelard. "_Cela_ (he would add with a grim smile) _tranche la 

difficulte_." 

 

If semen is a stimulant when ingested, it is easy to suppose that it may 

exert a similar action on the woman who receives it into the vagina in 

normal sexual congress. It is by no means improbable that, as Mattei 

argued in 1878, this is actually the case. It is known that the vagina 

possesses considerable absorptive power. Thus Coen and Levi, among others, 

have shown that if a tampon soaked in a solution of iodine is introduced 

into the vagina, iodine will be found in the urine within an hour. And the 

same is true of various other substances.[137] If the vagina absorbs drugs 

it probably absorbs semen. Toff, of Braila (Roumania), who attaches much 

importance to such absorption, considers that it must be analogous to the 

ingestion of organic extractives. It is due to this influence, he 

believes, that weak and anaemic girls so often become full-blooded and 

robust after marriage, and lose their nervous tendencies and shyness.[138] 

 

It is, however, most certainly a mistake to suppose that the beneficial 

influence of coitus on women is exclusively, or even mainly, dependent 

upon the absorption of semen. This is conclusively demonstrated by the 

fact that such beneficial influence is exerted, and in full measure, even 

when all precautions have been taken to avoid any contact with the semen. 

In so far as _coitus reservatus_ or _interruptus_ may lead to haste or 

discomfort which prevents satisfactory orgasm on the part of the woman, it 

is without doubt a cause of defective detumescence and incomplete 

satisfaction. But if orgasm is complete the beneficial effects of coitus 

follow even if there has been no possibility of the absorption of semen. 

Even after _coitus interruptus_, if it can be prolonged for a period long 

enough for the woman to attain full and complete satisfaction, she is 

enabled to experience what she may describe as a feeling of intoxication, 

lasting for several hours. It is in the action of the orgasm itself, and 

the vascular, secretory, and metabolic activities set up by the psychic 

and nervous influence of coitus with a beloved person, that we must seek 


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