Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

IV. 

 

The Aptitude for Detumescence--Is There an Erotic Temperament?--The 

Available Standards of Comparison--Characteristics of the 

Castrated--Characteristics of Puberty--Characteristics of the State of 

Detumescence--Shortness of Stature--Development of the Secondary Sexual 

Characters--Deep Voice--Bright Eyes--Glandular Activity--Everted 

Lips--Pigmentation--Profuse Hair--Dubious Significance of Many of These 

Characters. 

 

 

What, if any, are the indications which the body generally may furnish as 

to the individual's aptitude and vigor for the orgasm of detumescence? Is 

there an erotic temperament outwardly and visibly displayed? That is a 

question which has often occupied those who have sought to penetrate the 

more intimate mysteries of human nature, and since we are here concerned 

with human beings in their relationship to the process of detumescence, we 

cannot altogether pass over this question, difficult as it is to discuss 

it with precision. 

 

The old physiognomists showed much confidence in dealing with the 

matter. Possibly they had more opportunities for observation than 

we have, since they often wrote in days when life was lived more 

nakedly than among ourselves, but their descriptions, while 

sometimes showing much insight, are inextricably mixed up with 

false science and superstition. 

 

In the _De Secretis Mulierum_, wrongly attributed to Albertus 

Magnus, we find a chapter entitled "Signa mulieris calidae naturae 

et quae coit libenter," which may be summarized here. "The signs," 

we are told, "of a woman of warm temperament, and one who 

willingly cohabits are these: youth, an age of over 12, or 

younger, if she has been seduced, small, high breasts, full and 

hard, hair in the usual positions; she is bold of speech, with a 

delicate and high voice, haughty and even cruel of disposition, 

of good complexion, lean rather than stout, inclined to like 

drinking. Such a woman always desires coitus, and receives 

satisfaction in the act. The menstrual flow is not abundant nor 

always regular. If she becomes pregnant the milk is not abundant. 

Her perspiration is less odorous than that of the woman of 

opposite temperament; she is fond of singing, and of moving 

about, and delights in adornments if she has any." 

 

Polemon, in his _Sulla Physionomia_, has given among the signs of 

libidinous impulse: knees turned inwards, abundance of hairs on 

the legs, squint, bright eyes, a high and strident voice, and in 

women length of leg below the knee. Aristotle had mentioned among 

the signs of wantonness: paleness, abundance of hair on the body, 

thick and black hair, hairs covering the temples, and thick 

eyelids. 

 

In the seventeenth century Bouchet, in his _Serees_ (Troisieme 

Seree), gave as the signs of virility which indicated that a man 

could have children: a great voice, a thick rough black beard, a 

large thick nose. 

 

G. Tourdes (Art. "Aphrodisie," _Dictionnaire Encyclopedique des 

Sciences Medicales_) thus summarized the ancient beliefs on this 

subject: "The erotic temperament has been described as marked by 

a lean figure, white and well-ranged teeth, a developed hairy 


Page 1 from 5: [1]  2   3   4   5   Forward