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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

system, a characteristic voice, air, and expression, and even a 

special odor." 

 

In approaching the question of the general physical indications of a 

special aptitude to the manifestation of vigorous detumescence, the most 

obvious preliminary would seem to be a study of the castrated. If we know 

the special peculiarities of those who by removal of the sexual glands at 

a very early age have been deprived of all ability to present the 

manifestations of detumescence, we shall probably be in possession of a 

type which is the reverse of that which we may expect in persons of a 

vigorously erotic temperament. 

 

The most general characteristics of eunuchs would appear to be an unusual 

tendency to put on fat, a notably greater length of the legs, absence of 

hair in the sexual and secondary sexual regions, a less degree of 

pigmentation, as noted both in the castrated negro and the white man, a 

puerile larynx and puerile voice. In character they are usually described 

as gentle, conciliatory, and charitable. 

 

There can be little doubt that castration in man tends to lead to 

lengthening of the legs (tibia and fibula) at puberty, from 

delayed ossification of the epiphyses. The hands and feet are 

also frequently longer and sometimes the forearms. At the same 

time the bones are more slender. The pelvis also is narrower. The 

eunuchs of Cairo are said to be easily seen in a crowd from their 

tall stature. (Collineau, quoting Lortet, _Revue Mensuelle de 

l'Ecole d'Anthropologie_, May, 1896.) The castrated Skoptzy show 

increased stature, and, it seems, large ears, with decreased 

chest and head (L. Pittard, _Revue Scientifique_, June 20, 1903.) 

Fere shows that in most of these respects the eunuch resembles 

beardless and infantile subjects. ("Les Proportions des Membres 

et les Caracteres Sexuels," _Journal de l'Anatomie et de la 

Physiologie_, November-December, 1897.) Similar phenomena are 

found in animals generally. Sellheim, carefully investigating 

castrated horses, swine, oxen and fowls, found retardation of 

ossification, long and slender extremities, long, broad, but low 

skull, relatively smaller pelvis and small thorax. ("Zur Lehre 

von den Sekundaeren Geschlechtscharakteren," _Beitraege zur 

Geburtshuelfe und Gynaekologie_, 1898, summarized in _Centralblatt 

fuer Anthropologie_, 1900, Heft IV.) 

 

As regards the mental qualities and moral character of the 

castrated, Griffiths considers that there is an undue prejudice 

against eunuchs, and refers to Narses, who was not only one of 

the first generals of the Roman Empire, but a man of highly 

estimable character. (_Lancet_, March 30, 1895.) Matignon, who 

has carefully studied Chinese eunuchs, points out that they 

occupy positions of much responsibility, and, though regarded in 

many respects as social outcasts, possess very excellent and 

amiable moral qualities (_Archives Cliniques de Bordeaux_, May, 

1896.) In America Everett Flood finds that epileptics and 

feeble-minded boys are mentally and morally benefited by 

castration. ("Notes on the Castration of Idiot Children," 

_American Journal of Psychology_, January, 1899.) It is often 


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