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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

forgotten that the physical and psychic qualities associated with 

and largely dependent on the ability to experience the impulse of 

detumescence, while essential to the perfect man, involve many 

egoistic, aggressive and acquisitive characteristics which are of 

little intellectual value, and at the same time inimical to many 

moral virtues. 

 

We have a further standard--positive this time rather than negative--to 

aid us in determining the erotic temperament: the phenomena of puberty. 

The efflorescence of puberty is essentially the manifestation of the 

ability to experience detumescence. It is therefore reasonable to suppose 

that the individuals in whom the special phenomena of puberty develop most 

markedly are those in whom detumescence is likely to be most vigorous. If 

such is the case we should expect to find the erotic temperament marked by 

developed larynx and deep voice, a considerable degree of pigmentary 

development in hair and skin, and a marked tendency to hairiness; while 

in women there should be a pronounced growth of the breasts and 

pelvis.[144] 

 

There is yet another standard by which we may measure the individual's 

aptitude for detumescence: the presence of those activities which are most 

prominently brought into play during the process of detumescence. The 

individual, that is to say, who is organically most apt to manifest the 

physiological activities which mainly make up the process of detumescence, 

is most likely to be of pronounced erotic temperament. 

 

"Erotic persons are of motor type," remark Vaschide and Vurpas, "and we 

may say generally that nearly all persons of motor type are erotic." The 

state of detumescence is one of motor and muscular energy and of great 

vascular activity, so that habitual energy of motor response and an active 

circulation may reasonably be taken to indicate an aptitude for the 

manifestation of detumescence. 

 

These three types may be said, therefore, to furnish us valuable though 

somewhat general indications. The individual who is farthest removed from 

the castrated type, who presents in fullest degree the characters which 

begin to emerge at the period of puberty, and who reveals a physiological 

aptitude for the vigorous manifestation of those activities which are 

called into action during detumescence, is most likely to be of erotic 

temperament. The most cautious description of the characteristics of this 

temperament given by modern scientific writers, unlike the more detailed 

and hazardous descriptions of the early physiognomists, will be found to 

be fairly true to the standards thus presented to us. 

 

The man of sexual type, according to Bierent (_La Puberte_, p. 

148), is hairy, dark and deep-voiced. 

 

"The men most liable to satyriasis," Bouchereau states (art. 

"Satyriasis," _Dictionnaire Encyclopedique des Sciences 

Medicales_), "are those with vigorous nervous system, developed 

muscles, abundant hair on body, dark complexion, and white 

teeth." 

 

Mantegazza, in his _Fisiologia del Piacere_, thus describes the 

sexual temperament: "Individuals of nervous temperament, those 

with fine and brown skins, rounded forms, large lips and very 

prominent larynx enjoy in general much more than those with 


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