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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

opposite characteristics. A universal tradition," he adds, 

"describes as lascivious humpbacks, dwarfs, and in general 

persons of short stature and with long noses." 

 

In a case of nymphomania in a young woman, described by Alibert 

(and quoted by Laycock, _Nervous Diseases of Women_, p. 28) the 

hips, thighs and legs were remarkably plump, while the chest and 

arms were completely emaciated. In a somewhat similar case 

described by Marc in his _De la Folie_ a peasant woman, who from 

an early age had experienced sexual hyperaesthesia, so that she 

felt spasmodic voluptuous feelings at the sight of a man, and was 

thus the victim of solitary excesses and of spasmodic movements 

which she could not repress, the upper part of the body was very 

thin, the hips, legs and thighs highly developed. 

 

In his work on _Uterine and Ovarian Inflammation_ (1862, p. 37) 

Tilt observes: "The restless, bashful eye, and changing 

complexion, in presence of a person of the opposite sex, and a 

nervous restlessness of body, ever on the move, turning and 

twisting on sofa or chair, are the best indications of sexual 

temperament." 

 

An extremely sensual little girl of 8, who was constantly 

masturbating when not watched, although brought up by nuns, was 

described by Busdraghi (_Archivio di Psichiatria_, fas. i, 1888, 

p. 53) as having chestnut hair, bright black eyes, an elevated 

nose, small mouth, pleasant round face, full colored cheeks, and 

plump and healthy aspect. 

 

A highly intelligent young Italian woman with strong and somewhat 

perverted sexual impulses is described as of attractive 

appearance, with olive complexion, small black almond-shaped 

eyes, dilated pupils, oblique thin eyebrows, very thick black 

hair, rather prominent cheek-bones, largely developed jaw, and 

with abundant down on lower part of cheeks and on upper lip. 

(_Archivio di Psichiatria_, 1899, fasc. v-vi.) 

 

As the type of the sensual woman in word and act, led by her 

passions to commit various sexual offenses, Ottolenghi describes 

(_Archivio di Psichiatria_, vol. xii, fasc. v-vi, p. 496) a woman 

of 32 who attempted to kill her lover. The daughter of parents 

who were neurotic and themselves very erotic, she was a highly 

intelligent and vivacious woman, with a pleasing and open face, 

very thick dark chestnut hair, large cheek-bones, adipose 

buttocks almost resembling those of a Hottentot, and very thick 

pubic hair. She was very fond of salt things. Sexual inclination 

began at the age of 7. 

 

Adler and Moll remark, very truly, that, so far at least as women are 

concerned, sexual anaesthesia or sexual proclivity cannot be unfailingly 

read on the features. Every woman desires to please, and coquetry is the 

sign of a cold, rather than of an erotic temperament.[145] It may be added 

that a considerable degree of congenital sexual anaesthesia by no means 

prevents a woman from being beautiful and attractive, though it must 

probably still always be said that, as Roubaud points out,[146] the woman 

of cold and intellectual temperament, the "femme de tete," however 

beautiful and skillful she may be, cannot compete in the struggle for love 


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