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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

beardless and 3 per cent without axillary hair. 

 

Below puberty the diameter of testicles is below 14 millimeters. 

There were 13 conscripts having a testicular diameter of less 

than 14 millimeters. These infantile individuals all belonged to 

the first three classes and mostly to the first. The average 

testicular diameter in the first class was nearly 24 millimeters, 

and progressively rose in the succeeding classes to over 26 

millimeters in the fourth. 

 

While there was not much difference in height, the first class 

was the shortest, the fourth the tallest. The fourth class also 

showed the greatest chest perimeter. The cephalic index of all 

classes was 84. (O. Ammon, "L'Infantilisme et le Feminisme au 

Conseil de Revision," _L'Anthropologie_, May-June, 1896.) 

 

We thus see that it is quite justifiable to admit a type of person who 

possesses a more than average aptitude for detumescence. Such persons are 

more likely to be short than tall; they will show a full development of 

the secondary sexual characters; the voice will tend to be deep and the 

eyes bright; the glandular activity of the skin will probably be marked, 

the lips everted; there is a tendency to a more than average degree of 

pigmentation, and there is frequently an abnormal prevalence of hair on 

some parts of the body. While none of these signs, taken separately, can 

be said to have any necessary connection with the sexual impulse, taken 

altogether they indicate an organism that responds to the instinct of 

detumescence with special aptitude or with marked energy. In these 

respects observation, both scientific and popular, concords with the 

probabilities suggested by the three standards in this matter which have 

already been set forth. 

 

 

No generalization, however, can here be set down in an absolute and 

unqualified manner. There are definite reasons why this should be so. 

There is, for instance, the highly important consideration that the sexual 

impulse of the individual may be conspicuous in two quite distinct ways. 

It may assume prominence because the individual possesses a highly 

vigorous and well-nourished organism, or its prominence may be due to 

mental irritation in a very morbid individual. In the latter 

case--although occasionally the two sets of conditions are combined--most 

of the signs we might expect in the former case may be absent. Indeed, the 

sexual impulses which proceed from a morbid psychic irritability do not in 

most cases indicate any special aptitude for detumescence at all; in that 

largely lies their morbid character. 

 

Again, just in the same way that the exaggerated impulse itself may either 

be healthy or morbid, so the various characters which we have found to 

possess some value as signs of the impulse may themselves either be 

healthy or morbid. This is notably the case as regards an abnormal growth 

of hair on the body, more especially when it appears on regions where 

normally there is little or no hair. Such hypertrichosis is frequently 

degenerative in character, though still often associated with the sexual 

system. When, however, it is thus a degenerative character of sexual 

nature, having its origin in some abnormal foetal condition or later 


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