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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY. 

 

The Relationship of Maternal and Sexual Emotion--Conception and Loss of 

Virginity--The Anciently Accepted Signs of This Condition--The Pervading 

Effects of Pregnancy on the Organism--Pigmentation--The Blood and 

Circulation--The Thyroid--Changes in the Nervous System--The Vomiting of 

Pregnancy--The Longings of Pregnant Women--Maternal Impressions--Evidence 

for and Against Their Validity--The Question Still Open--Imperfection of 

Our Knowledge--The Significance of Pregnancy. 

 

 

In analyzing the sexual impulse I have so far deliberately kept out of 

view the maternal instinct. This is necessary, for the maternal instinct 

is specific and distinct; it is directed to an aim which, however 

intimately associated it may be with that of the sexual impulse proper, 

can by no means be confounded with it. Yet the emotion of love, as it has 

finally developed in the world, is not purely of sexual origin; it is 

partly sexual, but it is also partly parental.[169] 

 

In so far as it is parental it is certainly mainly maternal. There is a 

drawing by Bronzino in the Louvre of a woman's head gazing tenderly down 

at some invisible object; is it her child or her lover? Doubtless her 

child, yet the expression is equally adequate to the emotion evoked by a 

lover. If we were here specifically dealing with the emotion of love as a 

complex whole, and not with the psychology of the sexual impulse, it would 

certainly be necessary to discuss the maternal instinct and its associated 

emotions. In any case it seems desirable to touch on the psychic state of 

pregnancy, for we are here concerned not only with emotions very closely 

connected with the sexual emotions in the narrower sense, but we here at 

last approach that state which it is the object of the whole sexual 

process to achieve. 

 

In civilized life a period of weeks, months, even years, may elapse 

between the establishment of sexual relations and the occurrence of 

conception. Under primitive conditions the loss of the virginal condition 

practically involves the pregnant condition, so that under primitive 

conditions very little allowance is made for the state, so common among 

civilized peoples, of the woman who is no longer a virgin, yet not about 

to become a mother. 

 

There is some interest in noting the signs of loss of virginity 

chiefly relied upon by ancient authors. In doing this it is 

convenient to follow mainly the full summary of authorities given 

by Schurig in his _Barthenologia_ early in the eighteenth 

century. The ancient custom, known in classic times, of measuring 

the neck the day after marriage was frequently practiced to 

ascertain if a girl was or was not a virgin. There were various 

ways of doing this. One was to measure with a thread the 

circumference of the bride's neck before she went to bed on the 

bridal night. If in the morning the same thread would not go 

around her neck it was a sure sign that she had lost her 

virginity during the night; if not, she was still a virgin or had 

been deflowered at an earlier period. Catullus alluded to this 

custom, which still exists, or existed until lately, in the south 

of France. It is perfectly sound, for it rests on the intimate 


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