Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

There is some slight difference of opinion among authorities as 

to the precise nature and causation of the sickness of pregnancy. 

Barnes, Horrocks and others regard it as physiological; but many 

consider it pathological; this is, for instance, the opinion of 

Giles. Graily Hewitt attributed it to flexion of the gravid 

uterus, Kaltenbach to hysteria, and Zaborsky terms it a neurosis. 

Whitridge Williams considers that it may be (1) reflex, or (2) 

neurotic (when it is allied to hysteria and amenable to 

suggestion), or (3) toxaemic. It really appears to lie on the 

borderland between healthy and diseased manifestations. It is 

said to be unknown to farmers and veterinary surgeons. It appears 

to be little known among savages; it is comparatively infrequent 

among women of the lower social classes, and, as Giles has found, 

women who habitually menstruate in a painless and normal manner 

suffer comparatively little from the sickness of pregnancy. 

 

 

We owe a valuable study of the sickness of pregnancy to Giles, 

who analyzed the records of 300 cases. He concluded that about 

one-third of the pregnant women were free from sickness 

throughout pregnancy, 45 per cent. were free during the first 

three months. When sickness occurred it began in 70 per cent. of 

cases in the first month, and was most frequent during the second 

month. The duration varied from a few days to all through. 

Between the ages of 20 and 25 sickness was least frequent, and 

there was less sickness in the third than in any other pregnancy. 

(This corresponds with the conclusion of Matthews Duncan that 25 

is the most favorable age for pregnancy.) To some extent in 

agreement with Gueniot, Giles believes that the vomiting of 

pregnancy is "one form of manifestation of the high nervous 

irritability of pregnancy." This high nervous tension may 

overflow into other channels, into the vascular and excretory 

system, causing eclampsia; into the muscular system, causing 

chorea, or, expending itself in the brain, give rise to hysteria 

when mild or insanity when severe. But the vagi form a very ready 

channel for such overflow, and hence the frequency of sickness in 

pregnancy. There are thus three main factors in the causation of 

this phenomenon: (1) An increased nervous irritability; (2) a 

local source of irritation; (3) a ready efferent channel for 

nervous energy. (Arthur Giles, "Observations on the Etiology of 

the Sickness of Pregnancy," _Transactions Obstetrical Society of 

London_, vol. xxv, 1894.) 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Page 6 from 6:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]