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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

Martin, who regards the phenomenon as normal, points out that 

when nausea and vomiting are absent or suddenly cease there is 

often reason to suspect something wrong, especially the death of 

the embryo. He also remarks that women who suffer from large 

varicose veins are seldom troubled by the nausea of pregnancy. 

(J.M.H. Martin, "The Vomiting of Pregnancy," _British Medical 

Journal_, December 10, 1904.) These observations may be connected 

with those of Evans (_American Gynaecological and Obstetrical 

Journal_, January, 1900), who attributes primary importance to 

the undoubtedly active factor of the irritation set up by the 

uterus, more especially the rhythmic uterine contractions; 

stimulation of the breasts produces active uterine contractions, 

and Evans found that examination of the breasts sufficed to bring 

on a severe attack of vomiting, while on another occasion this 

was produced by a vaginal examination. Evans believes that the 

purpose of these contractions is to facilitate the circulation of 

the blood through the large venous sinuses, the surcharging of 

the relatively stagnant pools with effete blood producing the 

irritation which leads to rhythmic contractions. 

 

It is on the basis of the increased vascular and glandular activity and 

the heightened nervous tension that the special psychic phenomena of 

pregnancy develop. The best known, and perhaps the most characteristic of 

these manifestations, is that known as "longings." By this term is meant 

more or less irresistible desires for some special food or drink, which 

may be digestible or indigestible, sometimes a substance which the woman 

ordinarily likes, such as fruit, and occasionally one which, under 

ordinary circumstances, she dislikes, as in one case known to me of a 

young country woman who, when bearing her child, was always longing for 

tobacco and never happy except when she could get a pipe to smoke, 

although under ordinary circumstances, like other young women of her 

class, she was without any desire to smoke. Occasionally the longings lead 

to actions which are more unscrupulous than is common in the case of the 

same person at other times; thus in one case known to me a young woman, 

pregnant with her first child, insisted to her sister's horror on entering 

a strawberry field and eating a quantity of fruit. These "longings" in 

their extreme form may properly be considered as neurasthenic obsessions, 

but in their simple and less pronounced forms they may well be normal and 

healthy. 

 

The old medical authors abound in narratives describing the 

longings of pregnant women for natural and unnatural foods. This 

affection was commonly called _pica_, sometimes _citra_ or 

_malatia_. Schurig, whose works are a comprehensive treasure 

house of ancient medical lore, devotes a long chapter (cap. II) 

of his _Chylologia_, published in 1725, to pica as manifested 

mainly, though not exclusively, in pregnant women. Some women, he 

tells us, have been compelled to eat all sorts of earthy 

substances, of which sand seems the most common, and one Italian 

woman when pregnant ate several pounds of sand with much 

satisfaction, following it up with a draught of her own urine. 


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