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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

his valuable statistical study of the longings of a series of 300 pregnant 

women, has shown that the percentage of women with longings is exactly the 

same (33 per cent.) among women who had suffered at some time during 

pregnancy from sickness as among the women who had not so suffered. 

Moreover, Giles found that the period of sickness frequently bore no 

relation to the time when there were cravings, and the patient often had 

cravings after the sickness had ceased. 

 

According to another theory these longings are mainly a matter of 

auto-suggestion. The pregnant woman has received the tradition of such 

longings, persuades herself that she has such a longing, and then becomes 

convinced that, according to a popular belief, it will be bad for the 

child if the longing is not gratified. Giles considers that this process 

of auto-suggestion takes place "in a certain number, perhaps even in the 

majority of cases."[184] 

 

The Duchess d'Abrantes, the wife of Marshal Junot, in her 

_Memoires_ gives an amusing account of how in her first pregnancy 

a longing was apparently imposed upon her by the anxious 

solicitude of her own and her husband's relations. Though 

suffering from constant nausea and sickness, she had no longings. 

One day at dinner after the pregnancy had gone on for some months 

her mother suddenly put down her fork, exclaiming: "I have never 

asked you what longing you have!" She replied with truth that she 

had none, her days and her nights being occupied with suffering. 

"No _envie!_" said the mother, "such a thing was never heard of. 

I must speak to your mother-in-law." The two old ladies consulted 

anxiously and explained to the young mother how an unsatisfied 

longing might produce a monstrous child, and the husband also now 

began to ask her every day what she longed for. Her 

sister-in-law, moreover, brought her all sorts of stories of 

children born with appalling mother's marks due to this cause. 

She became frightened and began to wonder what she most wanted, 

but could think of nothing. At last, when eating a pastille 

flavored with pineapple, it occurred to her that pineapple is an 

excellent fruit, and one, moreover, which she had never seen, for 

at that time it was extremely rare. Thereupon she began to long 

for pineapple, and all the more when she was told that at that 

season they could not be obtained. She now began to feel that she 

must have pineapple or die, and her husband ran all over Paris, 

vainly offering twenty louis for a pineapple. At last he 

succeeded in obtaining one through the kindness of Mme. 

Bonaparte, and drove home furiously just as his wife, always 

talking of pineapples, had gone to bed. He entered the room with 

the pineapple, to the great satisfaction of the Duchess's mother. 

(In one of her own pregnancies, it appears, she longed in vain 

for cherries in January, and the child was born with a mark on 

her body resembling a cherry--in scientific terminology, a 

_naevus_.) The Duchess effusively thanked her husband and wished 

to eat of the fruit immediately, but her husband stopped her and 

said that Corvisart, the famous physician, had told him that she 


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