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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

must on no account touch it at night, as it was extremely 

indigestible. She promised not to do so, and spent the night in 

caressing the pineapple. In the morning the husband came and cut 

up the fruit, presenting it to her in a porcelain bowl. Suddenly, 

however, there was a revulsion of feeling; she felt that she 

could not possibly eat pineapple; persuasion was useless; the 

fruit had to be taken away and the windows opened, for the very 

smell of it had become odious. The Duchess adds that henceforth, 

throughout her life, though still liking the flavor, she was only 

able to eat pineapple by doing a sort of violence to herself. 

(_Memories de la Duchesse d'Abrantes_, vol. iii, Chapter VIII.) 

It should be added that, in old age, the Duchess d'Abrantes 

appears to have become insane. 

 

The influence of suggestion must certainly be accepted as, at all events, 

increasing and emphasizing the tendency to longings. It can scarcely, 

however, be regarded as a radical and adequate explanation of the 

phenomenon generally. If it is a matter of auto-suggestion due to a 

tradition, then we should expect to find longings most frequent and most 

pronounced in multiparous women, who are best acquainted with the 

tradition and best able to experience all that is expected of a pregnant 

woman. But, as a matter of fact, the women who have borne most children 

are precisely those who are least likely to be affected by the longings 

which tradition demands they should manifest. Giles has shown that 

longings occur much more frequently in the first than in any subsequent 

pregnancy; there is a regular decrease with the increase in number of 

pregnancies until in women with ten or more children the longings scarcely 

occur at all. 

 

We must probably regard longings as based on a physiological and psychic 

tendency which is of universal extension and almost or quite normal. They 

are known throughout Europe and were known to the medical writers of 

antiquity. Old Indian as well as old Jewish physicians recognized them. 

They have been noted among many savage races to-day: among the Indians of 

North and South America, among the peoples of the Nile and the Soudan, in 

the Malay archipelago.[185] In Europe they are most common among the 

women of the people, living simple and natural lives.[186] 

 

The true normal relationship of the longings of pregnancy is with the 

impulsive and often irresistible longings for food delicacies which are 

apt to overcome children, and in girls often persist or revive through 

adolescence and even beyond. Such sudden fits of greediness belong to 

those kind of normal psychic manifestations which are on the verge of the 

abnormal into which they occasionally pass. They may occur, however, in 

healthy, well-bred, and well-behaved children who, under the stress of the 

sudden craving, will, without compunction and apparently without 

reflection, steal the food they long for or even steal from their parents 

the money to buy it. The food thus seized by a well-nigh irresistible 

craving is nearly always a fruit. Fruit is usually doled out to children 

in small quantities as a luxury, but we are descended from primitive human 

peoples and still more remote ape-like ancestors, by whom fruit was in its 


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