Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

season eaten copiously, and it is not surprising that when that season 

comes round the child, more sensitive than the adult to primitive 

influences, should sometimes experience the impulse of its ancestors with 

overwhelming intensity, all the more so if, as is probable, the craving is 

to some extent the expression of a physiological need. 

 

Sanford Bell, who has investigated the food impulses of children 

in America, finds that girls have a greater number of likes and 

dislikes in foods than boys of the same age, though at the same 

time they have less dislikes to some foods than boys. The 

proclivity for sweets and fruits shows itself as soon as a child 

begins to eat solids. The chief fruits liked are oranges, 

bananas, apples, peaches, and pears. This strong preference for 

fruits lasts till the age of 13 or 14, though relatively weaker 

from 10 to 13. In girls, however, Bell notes the significant fact 

from our present point of view that at mid-adolescence there is a 

revived taste for sweets and fruits. He believes that the growth 

of children in taste in foods recapitulates the experience of the 

race. (S. Bell, "An Introductory Study of the Psychology of 

Foods." _Pedagogical Seminary_, March, 1904.) 

 

The heightened nervous impressionability of pregnancy would appear to 

arouse into activity those primitive impulses which are liable to occur in 

childhood and in the unmarried girl continue to the nubile age. It is a 

significant fact that the longings of pregnant women are mainly for fruit, 

and notably for so wholesome a fruit as the apple, which may very well 

have a beneficial effect on the system of the pregnant woman. Giles, in 

his tabulation of the foods longed for by 300 pregnant women, found that 

the fruit group was by far the largest, furnishing 79 cases; apples were 

far away at the head, occurring in 34 cases out of the 99 who had 

longings, while oranges followed at a distance (with 13 cases), and in the 

vegetable group tomatoes came first (with 6 cases). Several women declared 

"I could have lived on apples," "I was eating apples all day," "I used to 

sit up in bed eating apples."[187] Pregnant women appear seldom to long 

for the possession of objects outside the edible class, and it seems 

doubtful whether they have any special tendency to kleptomania. Pinard has 

pointed out that neither Lasegue nor Lunier, in their studies of 

kleptomania, have mentioned a single shop robbery committed by a pregnant 

woman.[188] Brouardel has indeed found such cases, but the object stolen 

was usually a food. 

 

A further significant fact connecting the longings of pregnant women with 

the longings of children is to be found in the fact that they occur mainly 

in young women. We have, indeed, no tabulation of the ages of pregnant 

women who have manifested longings, but Giles has clearly shown that these 

chiefly occur in primiparae, and steadily and rapidly decrease in each 

successive pregnancy. This fact, otherwise somewhat difficult of 

explanation, is natural if we look upon the longings of pregnancy as a 

revival of those of childhood. It certainly indicates also that we can by 

no means regard these longings as exclusively the expression of a 


Page 5 from 6:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   Forward