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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

physiological craving, for in that case they would be liable to occur in 

any pregnancy unless, indeed, it is argued that with each successive 

pregnancy the woman becomes less sensitive to her own physiological state. 

 

 

 

 

There has been a frequent tendency, more especially among 

primitive peoples, to regard a pregnant woman's longings as 

something sacred and to be indulged, all the more, no doubt, as 

they are usually of a simple and harmless character. In the Black 

Forest, according to Ploss and Bartels, a pregnant woman may go 

freely into other people's gardens and take fruit, provided she 

eats it on the spot, and very similar privileges are accorded to 

her elsewhere. Old English opinion, as reflected, for instance, 

in Ben Jonson's plays (as Dr. Harriet C.B. Alexander has pointed 

out), regards the pregnant woman as not responsible for her 

longings, and Kiernan remarks ("Kleptomania and Collectivism," 

_Alienist and Neurologist_, November, 1902) that this is in "a 

most natural and just view." In France at the Revolution a law of 

the 28th Germinal, in the year III, to some extent admitted the 

irresponsibility of the pregnant woman generally,--following the 

classic precedent, by which a woman could not be brought before a 

court of justice so long as she was pregnant,--but the Napoleonic 

code, never tender to women, abrogated this. Pinard does not 

consider that the longings of pregnant women are irresistible, 

and, consequently, regards the pregnant woman as responsible. 

This is probably the view most widely held. In any case these 

longings seldom come up for medico-legal consideration. 


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