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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the animal's teats, but thought she would be trampled to death, 

and was ill and nervous for weeks afterwards. The child was a 

monster, with a fleshy substance--seeming to be prolonged from 

the spinal cord and to represent the brain--projecting from the 

floor of the skull. Both doctor and nurse were struck by the 

resemblance to a cow's teats before they knew the woman's story, 

and this was told by the woman immediately after delivery and 

before she knew to what she had given birth. (A. Ross Paterson, 

Reversby, Lincolnshire, _Lancet_, September 29, 1889.) 

 

During the second month of pregnancy the mother was terrified by 

a bullock as she was returning from market. The child reached 

full term and was a well-developed male, stillborn. Its head 

"exactly resembled a miniature cow's head;" the occipital bone 

was absent, the parietals only slightly developed, the eyes were 

placed at the top of the frontal bone, which was quite flat, with 

each of its superior angles twisted into a rudimentary horn. 

(J.T. Hislop, Tavistock, Devon, _Lancet_, November 1, 1890.) 

 

When four months pregnant the mother, a multipara of 30, was 

startled by a black and white collie dog suddenly pushing against 

her and rushing out when she opened the door. This preyed on her 

mind, and she felt sure her child would be marked. The whole of 

the child's right thigh was encircled by a shining black mole, 

studded with white hairs; there was another mole on the spine of 

the left scapula. (C.F. Williamson, Horley, Surrey, _Lancet_, 

October 11, 1890.) 

 

A lady in comfortable circumstances, aged 24, not markedly 

emotional, with one child, in all respects healthy, early in her 

pregnancy saw a man begging whose arms and legs were "all doubled 

up." This gave her a shock, but she hoped no ill effects would 

follow. The child was an encephalous monster, with the 

extremities rigidly flexed and the fingers clenched, the feet 

almost sole to sole. In the next pregnancy she frequently passed 

a man who was a partial cripple, but she was not unduly 

depressed; the child was a counterpart of the last, except that 

the head was normal. The next child was strong and well formed. 

(C.W. Chapman, London, _Lancet_, October 18, 1890.) 

 

When the pregnant mother was working in a hayfield her husband 

threw at her a young hare he had found in the hay; it struck her 

on the cheek and neck. Her daughter has on the left cheek an 

oblong patch of soft dark hair, in color and character clearly 

resembling the fur of a very young hare. (A. Mackay, Port Appin, 

N.B., _Lancet_, December 19, 1891. The writer records also four 

other cases which have happened in his experience.) 

 

When the mother was pregnant her husband had to attend to a sow 

who could not give birth to her pigs; he bled her freely, cutting 

a notch out of both ears. His wife insisted on seeing the sow. 

The helix of each ear of her child at birth was gone, for nearly 

or quite half an inch, as if cut purposely. (R.P. Roons, _Medical 

World_, 1894.) 

 

A lady when pregnant was much interested in a story in which one 


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