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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

tempted Eve is always popularly imagined to be an apple. One may perhaps 

refer in this connection to the fact that at Rome and elsewhere the 

testicles have been called apples. I may add that we find a curious proof 

of the recognition of the feminine love of apples in an old Portuguese 

ballad, "Donna Guimar," in which a damsel puts on armour and goes to the 

wars; her sex is suspected and as a test, she is taken into an orchard, 

but Donna Guimar is too wary to fall into the trap, and turning away from 

the apples plucks a citron. 

 

[188] A. Pinard, Art. "Grossesse," _Dictionnaire Encyclopedique des 

Sciences Medicales_, p. 138. On the subject of violent, criminal and 

abnormal impulses during pregnancy, see Cumston, "Pregnancy and Crime," 

_American Journal Obstetrics_, December, 1903. 

 

[189] See especially Ploss and Bartels, _Das Weib_, vol. i, Chapter XXXI. 

Ballantyne in his work on the pathology of the foetus adds Loango negroes, 

the Eskimo and the ancient Japanese. 

 

[190] In 1731 Schurig, in his _Syllepsilogia_, devoted more than a hundred 

pages (cap. IX) to summarizing a vast number of curious cases of maternal 

impressions leading to birth-marks of all kinds. 

 

[191] J.W. Ballantyne has written an excellent history of the doctrine of 

maternal impressions, reprinted in his _Manual of Antenatal Pathology: The 

Embryo_, 1904, Chapter IX; he gives a bibliography of 381 items. In 

Germany the history of the question has been written by Dr. Iwan Bloch 

(under the pseudonym of Gerhard von Welsenburg), _Das Versehen der 

Frauen_, 1899. Cf., in French, G. Variot, "Origine des Prejuges Populaires 

sur les Envies," _Bulletin Societe d'Anthropologie_, Paris, June 18, 1891. 

Variot rejects the doctrine absolutely, Bloch accepts it, Ballantyne 

speaks cautiously. 

 

[192] J.G. Kiernan has shown how many of the alleged cases are negatived 

by the failure to take this fact into consideration. (_Journal of American 

Medical Association_, December 9, 1899.) 

 

[193] J. Clifton Edgar, _The Practice of Obstetrics_, second edition, 

1904, p. 296. In an important discussion of the question at the American 

Gynaecological Society in 1886, introduced by Fordyce Barker, various 

eminent gynaecologists declared in favor of the doctrine, more or less 

cautiously. (_Transactions of the American Gynaecological Society_, vol. 

xi, 1886, pp. 152-196.) Gould and Pyle, bringing forward some of the data 

on the question (_Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine_, pp. 81, _et 

seq._) state that the reality of the influence of maternal impressions 

seems fully established. On the other side, see G.W. Cook, _American 

Journal of Obstetrics_, September, 1889, and H.F. Lewis, ib., July, 1899. 

 

[194] _Transactions Edinburgh Obstetrical Society_, vol. xvii, 1892. 

 

[195] J.W. Ballantyne, _Manual of Antenatal Pathology: The Embryo_, p. 45. 

 

[196] W.C. Dabney, "Maternal Impressions," Keating's _Cyclopaedia of 

Diseases of Children_, vol. i, 1889, pp. 191-216. 

 

[197] Fere, _Sensation et Mouvement_, Chapter XIV, "Sur la Psychologie du 

Foetus." 

 

[198] J. Thomson, "Defective Co-ordination in Utero," _British Medical 

Journal_, September 6, 1902. 

 

[199] H. Campbell, _Nervous Organization of Man and Woman_, p. 206; cf. 


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