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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

discovered his mania and skillfully enabled him to yield to it 

without shock to his modesty. He was devoted to this mistress, 

who had very beautiful feet (he had been horrified by the feet of 

Europeans generally), until she finally left him. (_Archives de 

Neurologie_, October, 1904.) 

 

Probably the first case of shoe-fetichism ever recorded in any 

detail is that of Restif de la Bretonne (1734-1806), publicist 

and novelist, one of the most remarkable literary figures of the 

later eighteenth century in France. Restif was a neurotic 

subject, though not to an extreme degree, and his shoe-fetichism, 

though distinctly pronounced, was not pathological; that is to 

say, that the shoe was not itself an adequate gratification of 

the sexual impulse, but simply a highly important aid to 

tumescence, a prelude to the natural climax of detumescence; only 

occasionally, and _faute de mieux_, in the absence of the beloved 

person, was the shoe used as an adjunct to masturbation. In 

Restif's stories and elsewhere the attraction of the shoe is 

frequently discussed or used as a motive. His first decided 

literary success, _Le Pied de Fanchette_, was suggested by a 

vision of a girl with a charming foot, casually seen in the 

street. While all such passages in his books are really founded 

on his own personal feelings and experiences, in his elaborate 

autobiography, _Monsieur Nicolas_, he has frankly set forth the 

gradual evolution and cause of his idiosyncrasy. The first 

remembered trace dated from the age of 4, when he was able to 

recall having remarked the feet of a young girl in his native 

place. Restif was a sexually precocious youth, and at the age of 

9, though both delicate in health and shy in manners, his 

thoughts were already absorbed in the girls around him. "While 

little Monsieur Nicolas," he tells us, "passed for a Narcissus, 

his thoughts, as soon as he was alone, by night or by day, had no 

other object than that sex he seemed to flee from. The girls most 

careful of their persons were naturally those who pleased him 

most, and as the part least easy to keep clean is that which 

touches the earth it was to the foot-gear that he mechanically 

gave his chief attention. Agathe, Reine, and especially 

Madeleine, were the most elegant of the girls at that time; their 

carefully selected and kept shoes, instead of laces or buckles, 

which were not yet worn at Sacy, had blue or rose ribbon, 

according to the color of the skirt. I thought of these girls 

with emotion; I desired--I knew not what; but I desired 

something, if it were only to subdue them." The origin Restif 

here assigns to his shoe-fetichism may seem paradoxical; he 

admired the girls who were most clean and neat in their dress, he 

tells us, and, therefore, paid most attention to that part of 

their clothing which was least clean and neat. But, however 

paradoxical the remark may seem, it is psychologically sound. All 

fetichism is a kind of not necessarily morbid obsession, and as 

the careful work of Janet and others in that field has shown, an 


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