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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

casuists as the most abominable emblems of immodesty. At a first 

glance it is not easy to see why these shoes--terminating in a 

lion's claw, an eagle's beak, the prow of a ship, or other metal 

appendage--should be so scandalous. The excommunication inflicted 

on this kind of foot-gear preceded the impudent invention of some 

libertine, who wore _poulaines_ in the shape of the phallus, a 

custom adopted also by women. This kind of _poulaine_ was 

denounced as _mandite de Dicu_ (Ducange's Glossary, at the word 

Poulainia) and prohibited by royal ordinances (see letter of 

Charles V., 17 October, 1367, regarding the garments of the women 

of Montpellier). Great lords and ladies continued, however, to 

wear _poulaines_." In Louis XL's court they were still worn of a 

quarter of an ell in length. 

 

Spain, ever tenacious of ancient ideas, appears to have preserved 

longer than other countries the ancient classic traditions in 

regard to the foot as a focus of modesty and an object of sexual 

attraction. In Spanish religious pictures it was always necessary 

that the Virgin's feet should be concealed, the clergy ordaining 

that her robe should be long and flowing, so that the feet might 

be covered with decent folds. Pacheco, the master and 

father-in-law of Velasquez, writes in 1649 in his _Arte de la 

Pintura_: "What can be more foreign from the respect which we owe 

to the purity of Our Lady the Virgin than to paint her sitting 

down with one of her knees placed over the other, and often with 

her sacred feet uncovered and naked. Let thanks be given to the 

Holy Inquisition which commands that this liberty should be 

corrected!" It was Pacheco's duty in Seville to see that these 

commands were obeyed. At the court of Philip IV. at this time the 

princesses never showed their feet, as we may see in the pictures 

of Velasquez. When a local manufacturer desired to present that 

monarch's second bride, Mariana of Austria, with some silk 

stockings the offer was indignantly rejected by the Court 

Chamberlain: "The Queen of Spain has no legs!" Philip V.'s, queen 

was thrown from her horse and dragged by the feet; no one 

ventured to interfere until two gentlemen bravely rescued her and 

then fled, dreading punishment by the king: they were, however, 

graciously pardoned. Reinach ("Pieds Pudiques," _Cultes, Mythes 

et Religions_, pp. 105-110) brings together several passages from 

the Countess D'Aulnoy's account of the Madrid Court in the 

seventeenth century and from other sources, showing how careful 

Spanish ladies were as regards their feet, and how jealous 

Spanish husbands were in this matter. At this time, when Spanish 

influence was considerable, the fashion of Spain seems to have 

spread to other countries. One may note that in Vandyck's 

pictures of English beauties the feet are not visible, though in 

the more characteristically English painters of a somewhat later 

age it became usual to display them conspicuously, while the 

French custom in this matter is the farthest removed from the 

Spanish. At the present day a well-bred Spanish woman shows as 


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