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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

active service at the front he sustained a nasty fall from his 

horse, breaking his leg. He was unconscious for four days, and 

was then invalided down to Cape Town. Here he rapidly got well, 

and his accustomed health returning to him he started having what 

he terms 'a good time.' He repeatedly went to brothels, but was 

unable to have more than a temporary erection, and no ejaculation 

would take place. In one of these places he was in company with a 

drunken trooper, who suggested that they should perform the 

sexual act with their boots and spurs (only) on. My patient, who 

was also drunk, readily assented, and to his surprise was enabled 

to perform the act of copulation without any difficulty at all. 

He has repeatedly tried since to perform the act without any 

spurs, but is quite unable to do so; with the spurs he has no 

difficulty at all in obtaining all the gratification he desires. 

His general health is good. His mother was an extremely nervous 

woman, and so is his sister. His father died when he was quite 

young. His only other relation in the colony is a married sister, 

who seems to enjoy vigorous health." 

 

The consideration of the cases here brought forward may suffice to show 

that beyond those fetichisms which find their satisfaction in the 

contemplation of a part of the body or a garment, there is a more subtle 

symbolism. The foot is a center of force, an agent for exerting pressure, 

and thus it furnishes a point of departure not alone for the merely static 

sexual fetich, but for a dynamic erotic symbolization. The energy of its 

movements becomes a substitute for the energy of the sexual organs 

themselves in coitus, and exerts the same kind of fascination. The young 

girl (page 35) "who seemed to have a passion for treading upon things 

which would scrunch or yield under her foot," already possessed the germs 

of an erotic symbolism which, under the influence of circumstances in 

which she herself took an active part, developed into an adequate method 

of sexual gratification.[23] The youth who was her partner learned, in the 

same way, to find an erotic symbolism in all the pressure reactions of 

attractive feminine feet, the swaying of a carriage beneath their weight, 

the crushing of the flowers on which they tread, the slow rising of the 

grass which they have pressed. Here we have a symbolism which is 

altogether different from that fetichism which adores a definite object; 

it is a dynamic symbolism finding its gratification in the spectacle of 

movements which ideally recall the fundamental rhythm and pressure 

reactions of the sexual process. 

 

We may trace a very similar erotic symbolism in an absolutely normal form. 

The fascination of clothes in the lover's eyes is no doubt a complex 

phenomenon, but in part it rests on the aptitudes of a woman's garments to 

express vaguely a dynamic symbolism which must always remain indefinite 

and elusive, and on that account always possess fascination. No one has so 

acutely described this symbolism as Herrick, often an admirable 

psychologist in matters of sexual attractiveness. Especially instructive 

in this respect are his poems, "Delight in Disorder," "Upon Julia's 


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