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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

_Song of Songs_ the lover says of his mistress, "Thy navel is 

like a round goblet, wherein no mingled wine is wanting;" in his 

lyric "To Dianeme," Herrick says with clear reference to the 

mons veneris:-- 

 

"Show me that hill where smiling love doth sit, 

Having a living fountain under it;" 

 

and in the very numerous poems in various languages which have 

more or less obscurely dealt with the rose as the emblem of the 

feminine pudenda there are occasional references to the stream 

which guards or presides over the rose. It may, indeed, be 

recalled that even in the name _nymphae_ anatomists commonly apply 

to the _labia minora_ there is generally believed to be a poetic 

allusion to the Nymphs who presided over streams, since the 

_labia minora_ exert an influence on the direction of the urinary 

stream. 

 

In _Wilhelm Meister_ (Part I, Chapter XV), Goethe, on the basis 

of his own personal experiences, describes his hero's emotions in 

the humble surroundings of Marianne's little room as compared 

with the stateliness and order of his own home. "It seemed to him 

when he had here to remove her stays in order to reach the 

harpsichord, there to lay her skirt on the bed before he could 

seat himself, when she herself with unembarrassed frankness would 

make no attempt to conceal from him many natural acts which 

people are accustomed to hide from others out of decency--it 

seemed to him, I say, that he became bound to her by invisible 

bands." We are told of Wordsworth (Findlay's _Recollections of De 

Quincey_, p. 36) that he read _Wilhelm Meister_ till "he came to 

the scene where the hero, in his mistress's bedroom, becomes 

sentimental over her dirty towels, etc., which struck him with 

such disgust that he flung the book out of his hand, would never 

look at it again, and declared that surely no English lady would 

ever read such a work." I have, however, heard a woman of high 

intellectual distinction refer to the peculiar truth and beauty 

of this very passage. 

 

In one of his latest novels, _Les Rencontres de M. de Breot_, 

Henri de Regnier, one of the most notable of recent French 

novelists, narrates an episode bearing on the matter before us. A 

personage of the story is sitting for a moment in a dark grotto 

during a night fete in a nobleman's park, when two ladies enter 

and laughingly proceed to raise their garments and accomplish a 

natural necessity. The man in the background, suddenly overcome 

by a sexual impulse, starts forward; one lady runs away, the 

other, whom he detains, offers little resistance to his advances. 

To M. de Breot, whom he shortly after encounters, he exclaims, 

abashed at his own actions: "Why did I not flee? But could I 

imagine that the spectacle of so disgusting a function would have 

any other effect than to give me a humble opinion of human 

nature?" M. de Breot, however, in proceeding to reproach his 

interlocutor for his inconsiderate temerity, observes: "What you 

tell me, sir, does not entirely surprise me. Nature has placed 

very various instincts within us, and the impulse that led you to 


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