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Table of contents
PREFACE
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-1.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-2.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.4
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-3.5
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-4.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.1
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.2
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-5.3
EROTIC SYMBOLISM-6
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-1.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.3
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-2.4
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-3.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.1
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.2
THE MECHANISM OF DETUMESCENCE-4.3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-1
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-2
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-3
THE PSYCHIC STATE IN PREGNANCY-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-1.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-2.2
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-3-4
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.1
HISTORIES OF SEXUAL DEVELOPMENT HISTORY-5.2
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Greek water of aspersion, according to Theocritus, was mixed 

with salt, as is sometimes the modern Italian holy water. J.J. 

Blunt, _Vestiges of Ancient Manners and Customs_, p. 173.) Among 

the Hottentots, as Kolbein and others have recorded, the medicine 

man urinated alternately on bride and bridegroom, and a 

successful young warrior was sprinkled in the same way. Mungo 

Park mentions that in Africa on one occasion a bride sent a bowl 

of her urine which was thrown over him as a special mark of honor 

to a distinguished guest. Pennant remarked that the Highlanders 

sprinkled their cattle with urine, as a kind of holy water, on 

the first Monday in every quarter. (Bourke, _Scatalogic Rites_, 

pp. 228, 239; Brand, _Popular Antiquities_, "Bride-Ales.") 

 

Even the excreta of animals have sometimes been counted sacred. 

This is notably so in the case of the cow, of all animals the 

most venerated by primitive peoples, and especially in India. 

Jules Bois (_Visions de l'Inde_, p. 86) describes the spectacle 

presented in the temple of the cows at Benares: "I put my head 

into the opening of the holy stables. It was the largest of 

temples, a splendor of precious stones and marble, where the 

venerated heifers passed backwards and forwards. A whole people 

adored them. They take no notice, plunged in their divine and 

obscure unconsciousness. And they fulfil with serenity their 

animal functions; they chew the offerings, drink water from 

copper vessels, and when they are filled they relieve themselves. 

Then a stercoraceous and religious insanity overcomes these 

starry-faced women and venerable men; they fall on their knees, 

prostrate themselves, eat the droppings, greedily drink the 

liquid, which for them is miraculous and sacred." (Cf. Bourke, 

_Scatalogic Rites_, Chapter XVII.) 

 

Among the Chevsurs of the Caucasus, perhaps an Iranian people, a 

woman after her confinement, for which she lives apart, purifies 

herself by washing in the urine of a cow and then returns home. 

This mode of purification is recommended in the Avesta, and is 

said to be used by the few remaining followers of this creed. 

 

We have not only to take into account the frequency with which among 

primitive peoples the excretions possess a religious significance. It is 

further to be noted that in the folk-lore of modern Europe we everywhere 

find plentiful evidence of the earlier prevalence of legends and practices 

of a scatalogical character. It is significant that in the majority of 

cases it is easy to see a sexual reference in these stories and customs. 

The legends have lost their earlier and often mythical significance, and 

frequently take on a suggestion of obscenity, while the scatalogical 

practices have become the magical devices of lovelorn maidens or forsaken 

wives practiced in secrecy. It has happened to scatalogical rites to be 

regarded as we may gather from the _Clouds_ of Aristophanes, that the 

sacred leathern phallus borne by the women in the Bacchanalia was becoming 

in his time, an object to arouse the amusement of little boys. 

 

Among many primitive peoples throughout the world, and among the 


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